Finance
 
Labor
 
Resumes
 
Skills
 
Theory
 
 
 
Games
 
Viruses
 
 
COOKING
 
African
 
Baking
 
Beer
 
Bread
 
Cakes
 
Chinese
 
Cookies
 
Dairy
 
Essays
 
French
 
Fruit
 
German
 
Gourmet
 
Heart
 
History
 
Holiday
 
Italian
 
Low Fat
 
Meat
 
Mexican
 
Outdoor
 
Pasta
 
Pies
 
Pizza
 
Salads
 
Seafood
 
Spanish
 
Turkish
 
 
 
DESIGN
 
Fashion
 
 
 
Essays
 
Finance
 
Higher
 
History
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HISTORY
 
China
 
Egypt)
 
Essays
 
France
 
Germany
 
Greece)
 
Ireland
 
Israel
 
Italy
 
Japan
 
Jewish
 
Korea
 
Mexico
 
 
 
 
Other
 
Royalty
 
 
Careers
 
Drama
 
Other
 
Travel
 
 
 
LAW
 
Courts
 
Essays
 
Federal
 
Health
 
Public
 
Sports
 
Torts
 
Wills
 
 
 
 
 
MEDICAL
 
Essays
 
Ethics
 
Healing
 
History
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Essays
 
Peace
 
 
 
 
Adult
 
Amish
 
Atheism
 
Baha'i
 
Baptist
 
Clergy
 
Cults
 
Deism
 
Eastern
 
Essays
 
Ethics
 
Faith
 
History
 
History
 
Jewish
 
Prayer
 
Quaker
 
Sikhism
 
Sufi
 
Talmud
 
Taoist)
 
Theism
 
Zen)
 
 
SCIENCE
 
Biology
 
Botany
 
Ecology
 
Energy
 
Essays
 
Geology
 
Gravity
 
History
 
Light
 
Nuclear
 
Time
 
 
 
Essays
 
Slavery
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY - Historical
 
Sort By: Products per Page:
  12345   [NEXT > >] Displaying 1 to 15 of 1000+
By Jerry Mitchell

I am amazed at the story of the author’s struggles and his overcoming. I was not able to put the story down.
—Arnold Gomez, Friend and Business Owner

In order to escape the disaster of the 1939 Dust Bowl in Oklahoma, author Jerry Mitchell’s parents had to make a difficult decision that would affect the family for the rest of their lives. His parents and four older sisters became a part of the massive migration of folks who left to look for a promise land of better things. This exodus marked the beginning of the separation of families and of family connections.

In In the Shadow of Wrath, Mitchell explores his life and how his parents’ early choices impacted him and changed his historical path. This memoir narrates his journey and includes a chronological recap of his experiences, from his schooling to his combat service in Vietnam, to his readjustment to civilian life, and the building of his own family.

Mitchell shares how he has risen and fallen just as the ocean’s tides, but because of the strengths of those who came before him, he has weathered well.


FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$9.99
By Jerry Mitchell

I am amazed at the story of the author’s struggles and his overcoming. I was not able to put the story down.
—Arnold Gomez, Friend and Business Owner

In order to escape the disaster of the 1939 Dust Bowl in Oklahoma, author Jerry Mitchell’s parents had to make a difficult decision that would affect the family for the rest of their lives. His parents and four older sisters became a part of the massive migration of folks who left to look for a promise land of better things. This exodus marked the beginning of the separation of families and of family connections.

In In the Shadow of Wrath, Mitchell explores his life and how his parents’ early choices impacted him and changed his historical path. This memoir narrates his journey and includes a chronological recap of his experiences, from his schooling to his combat service in Vietnam, to his readjustment to civilian life, and the building of his own family.

Mitchell shares how he has risen and fallen just as the ocean’s tides, but because of the strengths of those who came before him, he has weathered well.


FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$18.95
By Charles H. Coleman and Mary Coleman

Thomas Lincoln, born in 1778, conquered the wilderness, built cabins and furniture, and supported his family as a farmer and carpenter. But his most important job was helping to raise Abraham Lincoln, who would become the sixteenth president of the United States of America.

His story reveals what the American experience was like for those who settled the West leading up to the nation’s pre-Civil War period. He set an example of honesty, morality, hard work, diligence, and good humor—all traits that were also associated with his son, Abraham, known as “Honest Abe.”

Charles H. Coleman, Ph.D., the former Chair of the Department of History at Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Illinois, and his daughter, Mary Coleman, explore Thomas Lincoln’s life in detail—starting with his ancestors in England to his death in 1851.

Despite the mythology that grew up around Abraham Lincoln, at the time of his father’s death, the family owned as much if not more than many of their neighbors. Success did not come easy, but Thomas Lincoln established the foundation that allowed his son to become a man who will always be remembered.


FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Charles H. Coleman and Mary Coleman

Thomas Lincoln, born in 1778, conquered the wilderness, built cabins and furniture, and supported his family as a farmer and carpenter. But his most important job was helping to raise Abraham Lincoln, who would become the sixteenth president of the United States of America.

His story reveals what the American experience was like for those who settled the West leading up to the nation’s pre-Civil War period. He set an example of honesty, morality, hard work, diligence, and good humor—all traits that were also associated with his son, Abraham, known as “Honest Abe.”

Charles H. Coleman, Ph.D., the former Chair of the Department of History at Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Illinois, and his daughter, Mary Coleman, explore Thomas Lincoln’s life in detail—starting with his ancestors in England to his death in 1851.

Despite the mythology that grew up around Abraham Lincoln, at the time of his father’s death, the family owned as much if not more than many of their neighbors. Success did not come easy, but Thomas Lincoln established the foundation that allowed his son to become a man who will always be remembered.


FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$12.95
By Charles H. Coleman and Mary Coleman

Thomas Lincoln, born in 1778, conquered the wilderness, built cabins and furniture, and supported his family as a farmer and carpenter. But his most important job was helping to raise Abraham Lincoln, who would become the sixteenth president of the United States of America.

His story reveals what the American experience was like for those who settled the West leading up to the nation’s pre-Civil War period. He set an example of honesty, morality, hard work, diligence, and good humor—all traits that were also associated with his son, Abraham, known as “Honest Abe.”

Charles H. Coleman, Ph.D., the former Chair of the Department of History at Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Illinois, and his daughter, Mary Coleman, explore Thomas Lincoln’s life in detail—starting with his ancestors in England to his death in 1851.

Despite the mythology that grew up around Abraham Lincoln, at the time of his father’s death, the family owned as much if not more than many of their neighbors. Success did not come easy, but Thomas Lincoln established the foundation that allowed his son to become a man who will always be remembered.


FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$22.95
By Sylvia Whitlock

The Rotary Club of Duarte, California, was chartered in District 530 in 1952. But just before its twenty-fifth birthday in 1976, the Duarte club violated Rotary’s bylaws by inviting women to join, ultimately causing its charter to be unceremoniously revoked by Rotary International. Undeterred, the club renamed itself the Ex-Rotary Club of Duarte and its members continued on their quest not to be outcasts of one of the greatest humanitarian organizations in the world.

Filled with facts and personal anecdotes, the first woman president in Rotary International shares a fascinating glimpse into the journey of the Duarte club. Sylvia Whitlock, who was present as the club enlisted help from the American Civil Liberties Union and took the case through the California court system until a landmark decision in May 1987, details the circumstances of the case as women struggled to attain equal rights, her role in the process, conversations with participants and onlookers, and the benefits she has gained personally through her own membership.

Women Also Serve shares a compelling history of the Duarte Rotary Club and its lofty undertaking to recruit women into its chapter through the perspective of one who was there.


FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Sylvia Whitlock

The Rotary Club of Duarte, California, was chartered in District 530 in 1952. But just before its twenty-fifth birthday in 1976, the Duarte club violated Rotary’s bylaws by inviting women to join, ultimately causing its charter to be unceremoniously revoked by Rotary International. Undeterred, the club renamed itself the Ex-Rotary Club of Duarte and its members continued on their quest not to be outcasts of one of the greatest humanitarian organizations in the world.

Filled with facts and personal anecdotes, the first woman president in Rotary International shares a fascinating glimpse into the journey of the Duarte club. Sylvia Whitlock, who was present as the club enlisted help from the American Civil Liberties Union and took the case through the California court system until a landmark decision in May 1987, details the circumstances of the case as women struggled to attain equal rights, her role in the process, conversations with participants and onlookers, and the benefits she has gained personally through her own membership.

Women Also Serve shares a compelling history of the Duarte Rotary Club and its lofty undertaking to recruit women into its chapter through the perspective of one who was there.


FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$11.95
By Stephen E. Bower

Lt. Gen. Tim Maude shares the distinction of being the highest ranking American soldier to lose his life in military action.

But unlike Lesley J. McNair and Simon B. Buckner Jr., both lieutenant generals who died during World War II, the battle he died in was not one he expected.

On Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists commandeered an American Airlines flight out of Dulles International Airport and crashed it into the southwest wall of the Pentagon, killing Maude and more than a hundred other military and civilian workers. Scores of other people were injured when the airliner ripped through the building at 530 miles per hour.

At the time of his death, Maude served as the deputy chief of staff for personnel, the Army’s chief executor of personnel policy and manager of the various programs affecting the strength and moral well-being of America’s land forces.

As one of only five members of the Army’s Adjutant General’s Corps to rise to the rank of lieutenant general, his story is one of triumph and celebration, and an abiding commitment to family, country, and service.


FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Stephen E. Bower

Lt. Gen. Tim Maude shares the distinction of being the highest ranking American soldier to lose his life in military action.

But unlike Lesley J. McNair and Simon B. Buckner Jr., both lieutenant generals who died during World War II, the battle he died in was not one he expected.

On Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists commandeered an American Airlines flight out of Dulles International Airport and crashed it into the southwest wall of the Pentagon, killing Maude and more than a hundred other military and civilian workers. Scores of other people were injured when the airliner ripped through the building at 530 miles per hour.

At the time of his death, Maude served as the deputy chief of staff for personnel, the Army’s chief executor of personnel policy and manager of the various programs affecting the strength and moral well-being of America’s land forces.

As one of only five members of the Army’s Adjutant General’s Corps to rise to the rank of lieutenant general, his story is one of triumph and celebration, and an abiding commitment to family, country, and service.


FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$25.95
By Stephen E. Bower

Lt. Gen. Tim Maude shares the distinction of being the highest ranking American soldier to lose his life in military action.

But unlike Lesley J. McNair and Simon B. Buckner Jr., both lieutenant generals who died during World War II, the battle he died in was not one he expected.

On Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists commandeered an American Airlines flight out of Dulles International Airport and crashed it into the southwest wall of the Pentagon, killing Maude and more than a hundred other military and civilian workers. Scores of other people were injured when the airliner ripped through the building at 530 miles per hour.

At the time of his death, Maude served as the deputy chief of staff for personnel, the Army’s chief executor of personnel policy and manager of the various programs affecting the strength and moral well-being of America’s land forces.

As one of only five members of the Army’s Adjutant General’s Corps to rise to the rank of lieutenant general, his story is one of triumph and celebration, and an abiding commitment to family, country, and service.


FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$35.95
By Perry L. Angle
Depressions’ Child tells the story of a man whose personality was altered by the Great Depression. Throughout his life the hardships that he endured turned him toward a bitter single purpose. He worked for financial gain in the mistaken belief that success would shield him from another horrid economic downturn. He was a person forced to fight bare knuckles in alleyways for prize money to buy bread. His own family became a means to an end. Only on his deathbed at age ninety-four did he realize that the depression sickness had caused him to hurt those he loved and he finally understood why his own son called him, The Emperor.

The story is told in classical tradition with the chapters reflecting the four imagined elements of the ancients--Fire, Earth, Air and Water. Each reinforces the overall mood changes of the individual and of the times. Here mythology, science, religion and psychology are interwoven to highlight various aspects of his incredible journey through dark periods in his life

It is a sad story that clearly proves that history can invade the psychology of the present.

FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Perry L. Angle
Depressions’ Child tells the story of a man whose personality was altered by the Great Depression. Throughout his life the hardships that he endured turned him toward a bitter single purpose. He worked for financial gain in the mistaken belief that success would shield him from another horrid economic downturn. He was a person forced to fight bare knuckles in alleyways for prize money to buy bread. His own family became a means to an end. Only on his deathbed at age ninety-four did he realize that the depression sickness had caused him to hurt those he loved and he finally understood why his own son called him, The Emperor.

The story is told in classical tradition with the chapters reflecting the four imagined elements of the ancients--Fire, Earth, Air and Water. Each reinforces the overall mood changes of the individual and of the times. Here mythology, science, religion and psychology are interwoven to highlight various aspects of his incredible journey through dark periods in his life

It is a sad story that clearly proves that history can invade the psychology of the present.

FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$11.95
By Robert Gilberg

New Bremen, Ohio, was mostly like countless other small farm towns in that part of the state in the 1950s. The primary business at the time was farming—corn, wheat, hay, alfalfa, and soybeans, along with some dairy farming—and there were always cows and pigs in the fields. And it’s where author Robert Gilberg spent the first twenty-two years of his life.

In The Last Road Rebel, he shares what it was like growing up in that small town. In this memoir, Gilberg admits he is probably lucky to have survived his childhood; some of his friends did not. He is also lucky to have met the right girl at the right time who unknowingly gave him the push needed for him to climb out of an early life with a limited future. The stories—some hilarious, some horribly sad, and some just fun—tell of a young person who experienced the tortures of found and lost teen love, knew the disappointment of poor preparation for life after school, and finally looked himself in the mirror and decided it was time to get out of that place.

Against the backdrop of the times, when the sounds on the radio were changing from Perry Como and Patti Page to Bill Haley and the Comets, Elvis, and Little Richard, The Last Road Rebel recalls the times, places, people, events, and experiences that have stayed with Gilberg forever.


FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$5.99
By Mary Parlato Caputo

On June 5, 1942, nine years after author Mary Caputo’s arrival from Italy, she met Nick Caputo, and their love story began. The young couple was joyful and filled with plans for future happiness until World War II interrupted them. Nick was attending Columbia University, but left to serve in the Army. After three years of service, he returned, they were married, and their blissful life began.

In A Tribute, Mary narrates their love story and pays tribute to Nick, who died in 1971 when two of his children were teenagers and one was just seven years old. Through diary entries and letters, this memoir shares details about Nick’s journey during World War II, including deployment to the European and Pacific theaters of war and service in the Manila Harbor.

With photos included, A Tribute shares the details of one couple’s love and devotion to each other and the tragedy of a man who died too soon.


FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$4.99
By Robert Gilberg

New Bremen, Ohio, was mostly like countless other small farm towns in that part of the state in the 1950s. The primary business at the time was farming—corn, wheat, hay, alfalfa, and soybeans, along with some dairy farming—and there were always cows and pigs in the fields. And it’s where author Robert Gilberg spent the first twenty-two years of his life.

In The Last Road Rebel, he shares what it was like growing up in that small town. In this memoir, Gilberg admits he is probably lucky to have survived his childhood; some of his friends did not. He is also lucky to have met the right girl at the right time who unknowingly gave him the push needed for him to climb out of an early life with a limited future. The stories—some hilarious, some horribly sad, and some just fun—tell of a young person who experienced the tortures of found and lost teen love, knew the disappointment of poor preparation for life after school, and finally looked himself in the mirror and decided it was time to get out of that place.

Against the backdrop of the times, when the sounds on the radio were changing from Perry Como and Patti Page to Bill Haley and the Comets, Elvis, and Little Richard, The Last Road Rebel recalls the times, places, people, events, and experiences that have stayed with Gilberg forever.


FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$20.95
  12345   [NEXT > >] Displaying 1 to 15 of 1000+