Spyglass Duets
Zoom   
Spyglass Duets
The Elizabethan & Jacobean Plotters
Published:
11/23/2009
Format:
Perfect Bound Softcover
Pages:
560
Size:
6x9
ISBN:
978-1-44019-287-6
Print Type:
B/W
Always leave a story better than you found it, or as Spedding once said: “When a thing is asserted as a fact, always ask who first reported it, and what means he had of knowing the truth.” Taking this quotation under advisement allowed us to create this work, leaving some space on how old Ministers used to look upon suspicion as good evidence or even considering Sir William Cecil’s saying that “it was as necessary that treason should exist, as that the nation should be preserved”. But why this was so evident in those times was because when men stepped into some position of Office, they retired from general society and confined themselves to a limited circle, no longer acknowledging the free observations of their acquaintances or looking at objects at first hand, but as through a secondary telescope. A ‘personal collision with mankind’ ceased for them as they turned implicitly to their secretaries and clerks. Hence raised a multitude of mistakes that was the frequent cause why men, who had been very good politicians out of Office, had made so sorry a figure in Office. And many are the persons who could do nothing whatever without a plot. They could hardly hang their hats upon a peg. They would even organize a plan for two years, which shall have no other importance but to dine with the squire of a neighbouring parish. It was such concepts of life that made all cunning persons superficial ones: there was never one exception, though there were short cuts taken, as for example when Henry VIII., had declared Elizabeth I., illegitimate and an Act passed the two Houses to that effect. When that Queen came to the throne, it was taken into consideration to repeal that Act, but “No!” said Sir Nicholas Bacon, ‘the Crown takes away all defects. Such is the old law and we will act upon it. It is wise to close a festered wound.” According to Bacon’s maxim, whoever acquired a Crown, no matter by what means, had a right to it.
Always leave a story better than you found it, or as Spedding once said: “When a thing is asserted as a fact, always ask who first reported it, and what means he had of knowing the truth.” Taking this quotation under advisement allowed us to create this work, leaving some space on how old Ministers used to look upon suspicion as good evidence or even considering Sir William Cecil’s saying that “it was as necessary that treason should exist, as that the nation should be preserved”. But why this was so evident in those times was because when men stepped into some position of Office, they retired from general society and confined themselves to a limited circle, no longer acknowledging the free observations of their acquaintances or looking at objects at first hand, but as through a secondary telescope. A ‘personal collision with mankind’ ceased for them as they turned implicitly to their secretaries and clerks. Hence raised a multitude of mistakes that was the frequent cause why men, who had been very good politicians out of Office, had made so sorry a figure in Office. And many are the persons who could do nothing whatever without a plot. They could hardly hang their hats upon a peg. They would even organize a plan for two years, which shall have no other importance but to dine with the squire of a neighbouring parish. It was such concepts of life that made all cunning persons superficial ones: there was never one exception, though there were short cuts taken, as for example when Henry VIII., had declared Elizabeth I., illegitimate and an Act passed the two Houses to that effect. When that Queen came to the throne, it was taken into consideration to repeal that Act, but “No!” said Sir Nicholas Bacon, ‘the Crown takes away all defects. Such is the old law and we will act upon it. It is wise to close a festered wound.” According to Bacon’s maxim, whoever acquired a Crown, no matter by what means, had a right to it.
Being a researcher of historical events for the past ten years, the Author finds that the public is very much misinformed of those times, especially of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. The above reason would be most important as to why this book was written, and hope to offer more light than shadow to those times. The Author, born and bred in Blackpool, UK, now lives in Greece. Her educational background tends to direct her toward British history and Baconianism that has been so very much misunderstood through the past centuries.
 
 


Buy This Book
Perfect Bound Softcover
Price $32.95
Share Print E-mail
 
facebook   twitter   Website